University of Wisconsin–Madison

Fleet Vehicle Fueling

Distantly shot image of two gas pumps in the middle of a parking lot.

Gasoline – 27 N. Charter Street Fuel Island

The photos above depict the gasoline fuel island at the Fleet and Service Garage, 27 N. Charter Street. Drivers are encouraged to use this fuel island for gasoline whenever possible, as fuel here is the lowest cost available.

Signs on the pumps warn against overfilling or topping off due to the vapor emissions produced. The pump signs have hinges, so during Ozone Action Days a warning can be displayed recommending vehicles avoid fueling until after 6 p.m.

Close-up image of two gas pumps in the middle of a parking lot.

Location

It is best to approach the fuel island from N. Mills Street. Enter Lot 50 from N. Mills Street and proceed west across the lot, toward the Fleet and Service Garage. You will see the fuel island (as pictured above) to the south of the building. Use the fuel card just like paying at the pump at a retail fuel station.

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Distant shot of a large fuel cylinder surrounded by yellow parking barriers.

Diesel Fuel – Herrick Drive Fuel Island

The photos above depict the diesel fuel island at Herrick Drive on the west campus. Drivers are encouraged to use this fuel island for diesel whenever possible, because the fuel here is a blend of 20% Biodiesel.

Location

Herrick Drive is the stretch of road behind the Biotron Laboratory and to the east of the West Campus Cogeneration Facility. The diesel fuel island is near the southernmost part of Herrick Drive. Google Maps Directions (opens in a new window)

Close up shot of a large diesel fuel cylinder surrounded by yellow parking barriers.

Fuel Information

The University uses a blend of 20% Biodiesel and 80% Ultra Low Sulfur petroleum diesel. This blend provides a cleaner burning fuel that results in far less particulate emissions and is partially made from domestic, renewable resources. Beginning in September 2006, 80% of all highway diesel fuel must be Ultra Low Sulfur (under 15 parts per million sulfur) and by May 2010 100% must meet that standard. In order to reduce emissions of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and particulates, the University is able to obtain diesel that meets the new standard today even though it is not generally available at private sector fuel retailers. By blending Ultra Low Sulfur diesel with Biodiesel, the University is not only contributing to cleaner air in Dane County, we are also contributing in a reduction of dependence on foreign oil.

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